Young Adult Fiction

Divergent

Divergent Book Cover

In a future society, sixteen year old Beatrice Prior must choose one of five factions where she will spend the rest of her life. Each faction is devoted to a specific virtue: Candor (honesty), Abnegation (selflessness), Dauntless (bravery), Amity (peace), and Erudite (knowledge). Her decision is complicated during a test each sixteen year old takes that tells them which faction they would best fit in with. For Beatrice the results are inconclusive and she is warned not to revel this to anyone or risk death. As Beatrice struggles to come to terms with what her test results mean and her future she discovers that the society she lives in is not as perfect as it seems. Reminiscent of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, this is recommended for teens that enjoy dystopian fiction.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children Book Cover

This is a very unusual book whose plot is punctuated by antique photographs. Unique for the young adult genre, it contains a bit of a mystery that will appeal to teens and adults both.

Leviathan

Leviathan Book Cover

If you are curious about the steampunk genre-this is a classic example. This book takes place during World War I as Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife are assassinated and the world goes to war. That is when the story takes a twist into an imaginary world. The conflict is between the Clankers, who create machines that run on steam, and the Darwinists, who create new species. Prince Aleksandar, whose people turn against him after his parents’ assassination, is a Clanker. He meets Deryn Sharp, a girl disguised as a boy working for the British Air Service. She serves on the Leviathan, a massive airship that crashes in Switzerland where the two teens cross paths. The story is exciting all the way to the end, when you will be left wanting to know what happens next.

The Witch of Blackbird Pond

The Witch of Blackbird Pond Book Cover

This is the story of Kit Tyler, a teenager struggling to fit into her community in the year 1687. After her grandfather dies, she must move from Barbados to the Colony of Connecticut to live with her aunt’s family. She is regarded suspiciously by the members of the Puritanical community, because she swims, and is headstrong. She befriends a Quaker woman known as the Witch of Blackbird Pond and soon the community suspects Kit may be a witch. The story brings the historical period of witch hunts to life, but it is also a story of love and family.

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale Book Cover

In Maus, Spiegelman narrates the story of his father’s survival of WWII and transforms it into a graphic novel. Through comic-book form, Spiegelman depicts the struggles and heartache of his family trying to survive in Nazi-occupied Poland. Because of the nature of the book, the reader is transported into the story with images and imagination, both of which make the story that much more moving.

Life as We Knew It

Life as We Knew It Book Cover

For 16 year old Miranda along with her friends, family, and classmates, the impending impact of a meteorite striking the moon is an event to look forward to. What they don’t realize is that life after the meteorite hits the moon will change their lives in a way no one expects. Written in the format of Miranda’s journal, the reader experiences the hope that comes along with surviving in a world forever changed.

The Pox party / taken from accounts by [Octavian Nothing’s] own hand and other sundry sources ; collected by M.T. Anderson of Boston

The Pox party / taken from accounts by [Octavian Nothing’s] own hand and other sundry sources ; collected by M.T. Anderson of Boston Book Cover

In this young adult novel, the story is centered on Octavian and his mother, Cassiopeia, an African princess, who were sold into slavery before the birth of Octavian during pre-Revolutionary War in America. Octavian is an experiment for the Novanglian College of Lucidity in Massachusetts to be studied for his African intellect and ethnicity in order to see if he can be successfully educated in comparison to white people. Anderson writes from the point of view of Octavian and we, the reader, see Octavian believing his life is normal to coming to the realization that his life is nothing more than a test. Octavian’s story, albeit fiction, really is an amazing account of the life of those living in slavery and their hope for freedom.